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Can't fly inspire in parks in Los Angeles

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The police shutdown flying all drones with tablet interfaces on Saturday. You can't even fly drones with tablet interfaces in model airplane fields. This is going to kill drone industry
 
I hope someone fights these laws in court. This is the one thing that may hold me back from getting an inspire. That's a lot of money to have tied up in something I can't use..
 
This is why it needs to be challenged. It's been said and argued that those are regulations and not laws. It would be interesting to see what local law enforcement would charge you with if you failed to comply. It's also worth mentioning that the "regulations" state that the operator need to maintain visual line of sight, it doesn't say no fpv. So if you're using a tablet, I would say you can maintain visual line of sight as well as view with the tablet.
 

And what's the problem with the fpv display?

I'm guessing this is one of those laws that isn't an actual law but the only way to challenge it is to go to court and doing that cost money.

So, if you can't fly in a public park where can you fly in LA?


Brian
 
The police shutdown flying all drones with tablet interfaces on Saturday. You can't even fly drones with tablet interfaces in model airplane fields. This is going to kill drone industry
Can you please NOT post the same post/thread in numerous locations? Once is sufficient and additionally it is directly against or community rules.
I will delete your duplicate posts
Secondly - what has this subject matter got to do with the X5 which is what this section relates to?
I have now moved this thread to 'General Discussion' where it belongs.

Thank You
 
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So if you're using a tablet, I would say you can maintain visual line of sight as well as view with the tablet.
But when you look at the tablet you're not looking at the machine, so that doesn't work.
You can have a drone with a tablet, but you can't look at it. Given that if you have one you will look at it - bam.
 
But when you look at the tablet you're not looking at the machine, so that doesn't work.
You can have a drone with a tablet, but you can't look at it. Given that if you have one you will look at it - bam.
I think that is pretty ridiculous. That would be equivalent to glancing away from the quad momentarily for any reason. Watch your step, look for other aircraft, someone is walking up behind you, the police are talking to me. Whops, just glanced away, take me to jail.

That's certainly not the spirit of the rule. If your maintaining visual line sight and you look at your fpv monitor to frame a photo or video but continue to watch the aircraft as well. I can't image what the problem would be.

One could certainly argue no goggles with this, but with a monitor that you can glance back and fourth..
 
This was introduced not only for quads but all RC models and it makes sense, I can't count how many people I know who have lost models precisely by shortly glancing away e.g. to look at the timer on the radio's screen and not being able to find the model again afterwards, I had several close calls myself before getting a radio that would talk to me... so it is a real issue and known risk.

One could argue that it's less important on nowadays' quads that keep themselves in flight and hopefully in position too, BUT not really as that still can't be considered reliable. Video feed is good - but only if it works.

I actually find it safer to use goggles and be fully concentrated on one point of view than glancing back and forth between a screen and the model and always having to "reprocess" the very different point of views to gauge distances, proximity to objects etc.
 
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This was introduced not only for quads but all RC models and it makes sense, I can't count how many people I know who have lost models precisely by shortly glancing away.

That seems kind of silly since what you are glancing at is the best view in the house, with no issues regarding orientation
 
Until it fails.

The whole goal is to ensure reliability and avoid new sources of failure. If you're continuously looking at the model (and of course flying it within appropriate distances so you can properly control it that way), which is what you're supposed to do, then you don't have a problem when the "newfangled video downlink" fails (and it does, we get a "my tablet crashed" post on here at least once a week). Someone else can be looking at the video.

Note that I don't necessarily agree, but I understand.
 
Until it fails.

The whole goal is to ensure reliability and avoid new sources of failure. If you're continuously looking at the model (and of course flying it within appropriate distances so you can properly control it that way), which is what you're supposed to do, then you don't have a problem when the "newfangled video downlink" fails (and it does, we get a "my tablet crashed" post on here at least once a week). Someone else can be looking at the video.

Note that I don't necessarily agree, but I understand.

I just can't agree to AP is banned or illegal. You simply can't do AP without a video feed
 
If you've got a camera operator and he's handling everything related to the video feed so you can concentrate on flying conventionally, no problem.

It's not the optimal situation to do the best possible job, but the job quality might need to suffer a bit in a compromise with safety.
 
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That seems kind of silly since what you are glancing at is the best view in the house, with no issues regarding orientation
I'm afraid this has been debated until the cows come home.
If you are flying exclusively FPV your situational awareness is virtually nil. You have a limited FOV (94 degrees at best), no aural sense to the extent you have on the ground and this is compounded many fold when flying BVLOS.
Commercial operation is limited to 500m distance VLOS at all times (unless express permission is granted by the relevant authority).
I'm afraid hobbiest flying rules are only set to get stricter.
 
I'm afraid this has been debated until the cows come home.
If you are flying exclusively FPV your situational awareness is virtually nil. You have a limited FOV (94 degrees at best), no aural sense to the extent you have on the ground and this is compounded many fold when flying BVLOS.
Commercial operation is limited to 500m distance VLOS at all times (unless express permission is granted by the relevant authority).
I'm afraid hobbiest flying rules are only set to get stricter.
In Australia they are very strict. Thats why many of us have spent the 10k to get a license. Without one, we are not allowed to fly higher than 400 feet and 500 metres. Certainly nowhere near a town or city or where there are people. These are not toys and its not the Police that will find people and dob them in to CASA. Its pilots like me that will do that. these idiots that fly outside the rules are making it hard for those of us that work at this job. I have seen many videos of guys flying high and far but dont expect to be able to do it for long. As I say, if anyone flew close to one of our cities, they would end up in jail, and so they should.
 
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Youtube is full of videos from drone operators flying with zero concern of the rules and safety. They treat this as just another toy and who needs any learnin to play with a toy. Sadly, it is there actions that doom the rest of us.

I frequent a number of other web forums and periodically see posts related to drone use. In many cases the poster is showing of the cool video they got and all too often that cool video was done by either breaking existing rules/laws or violating common sense safety concerns. When I politely challenge there methods it's not uncommon for them to get pissy about it and for others to chime in likewise.

People just don't think things through...

OTH, the idea that looking at a tablet is necessarily bad isn't true either. A pilot of an actual airplane is taught to perform a sweep of the instruments and looking out the cockpit windows so taking there eyes off the road ahead isn't a problem it's part of the solution. The challenge with out small drones is that they're small and at a distance hard to see. Maintaining proper situational awareness requires a disciplined approach, but mandating that discipline isn't easy when there little legal framework mandating the training to achieve it.

So, the easy solution is to ban there use which this rule effectively does.


Brian
 

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