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Did I over do this color grade?

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I think what you guys must be seeing is perspective distortion. This is a really big 6 story building and I am not square with it, I am flying in on at an angle.

If its off its not off its not off by enough to notice. View attachment 29724
It is off on all the videos you posted. It looks ok under the grid. Just look at the outside vertical edges of the building. The left is almost parallel with the frame edge, the right is tilted and the top leans towards the frame edge.
 
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It is off on all the videos you posted. It looks ok under the grid. Just look at the outside vertical edges of the building. The left is almost parallel with the frame edge, the right is tilted and the top leans towards the frame edge.
I’m not quite sure I understand what you mean but I’d like to.

This may not have anything to do with what you are saying but this building is built like two rectangles offset from each other. Meaning the right and left sides are not on the same plane.

Screen shots from other videos below. 91B9828A-9307-48B9-B645-0612219199F4.png E9710623-9975-491F-AA38-18339189C6AC.png
 
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The best way to establish if the building is tilted or not is to use a vertical guide line in the middle of the frame. Any vertical edge or window or structure of a building must be alligned with that vertical guide line. If the allignment is accurate in the centre of the frame all is good. You have plenty of vertical lines in this building to go by, that should help you to work out if the video needs to be rotated or not. Sometimes keyframing is required if the gimbal does not hold the horizon for the entire duration of a clip.
 
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This looks fine to me. Level out that horizon.

D
Oops hahaa ? I just realized I exported a frame from the original video after I had corrected the horizon already.

This is that last video before correction E7D17B4B-70D7-4375-8039-EE6036860AEA.jpeg
And this now after
A027D5A8-1D3C-4313-960B-7D2C6E324AE8.jpeg
Its about one degree off so you are right @Donnie Frank but are you guys really noticing the .5 - 1 degree difference or is it the perspective distortion that makes it look weird?
 
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The best way to establish if the building is tilted or not is to use a vertical guide line in the middle of the frame. Any vertical edge or window or structure of a building must be alligned with that vertical guide line. If the allignment is accurate in the centre of the frame all is good. You have plenty of vertical lines in this building to go by, that should help you to work out if the video needs to be rotated or not. Sometimes keyframing is required if the gimbal does not hold the horizon for the entire duration of a clip.
Cool! Thanks!
 
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Oops hahaa ? I just realized I exported a frame from the original video after I had corrected the horizon already.

This is that last video before correction View attachment 29728
And this now after
View attachment 29729
Its about one degree off so you are right @Donnie Frank but are you guys really noticing the .5 - 1 degree difference or is it the perspective distortion that makes it look weird?
The first frame is off, the second frame looks fine to me. Some people won't see the difference even if the building was off by 5 deg?. But as a professional I strife to deliver a professional job. And level horizon is a basic attribute, IMHO. And yes, I can see if the building is 1deg off.
 
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I think what you guys must be seeing is perspective distortion. This is a really big 6 story building and I am not square with it, I am flying in on at an angle.

If its off its not off its not off by enough to notice. View attachment 29724

From the most recent video:

1601878346210.png

Your photo is level. The most recent video is not, Mr. Bait-n-Switch...<;^)

In the "straight and level" game, horizon is king....unless the horizon is actually at an angle, like slanting in to a valley.

1601878507282.png

D
 
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From the most recent video:

View attachment 29733

Your photo is level. The most recent video is not, Mr. Bait-n-Switch...<;^)

In the "straight and level" game, horizon is king....unless the horizon is actually at an angle, like slanting in to a valley.

View attachment 29734

D
Bringing into the shot a horizontal guideline is not much of a help because you never know the topography of the landscape behind and if the horizon in the shot should be level or not. Unless of course it is a distant ocean horizon. The only true criterion to establish if a building in a shot is straight or not is a vertical guide run from top to bottom through the middle of the frame. Any vertical of a structure/building should line up with that vertical guide in the middle of the frame. That is the test I use and it has reliably worked for me.
 
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For future reference: Involve your client in the workstream. Their intended use may dictate a specific look. If that has not been identified prior to the job, take several stills and give them a chance to provide input. This color grade may be just what they're looking for, or, they want something that is washed out. If they are using for background it would have a different look than if they are wnating to punch a message.
 
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Bringing into the shot a horizontal guideline is not much of a help because you never know the topography of the landscape behind and if the horizon in the shot should be level or not. Unless of course it is a distant ocean horizon. The only true criterion to establish if a building in a shot is straight or not is a vertical guide run from top to bottom through the middle of the frame. Any vertical of a structure/building should line up with that vertical guide in the middle of the frame. That is the test I use and it has reliably worked for me.
I literally cited an exact example of this in the post just before yours. I beat ya to the punch...<;^)

D
 

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