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Thumbsticks down and in while in flight... drop like a rock?

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I think I read in the manual that if you put the thumb sticks down and in while in flight the inspire will shut down… Is this correct?

Does the power turn off as well or do the motors just stop spinning?

Are there no aerial maneuvers that require this stick position?

Thanks for reading.
 
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That is correct. CSC will start and stop the motors. You can test this with the props off while your Inspire is on the ground.


Are there no aerial maneuvers that require this stick position?
No. You would have to be doing something pretty dangerous and/or foolish to get the sticks into this configuration while flying.
 
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The Editor

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I think I read in the manual that if you put the thumb sticks down and in while in flight the inspire will shut down… Is this correct?

Does the power turn off as well or do the motors just stop spinning?

Are there no aerial maneuvers that require this stick position?

Thanks for reading.
This has been debated to death previously on the forum.
CSC is here to stay and is a safety feature to enable the user to kill the motors and ditch the aircraft in a potentially dangerous situation.
It acts to arm the esc's and to start the motors and also the reverse in order to kill them quickly.
There are no cinematic type maneuvers that will be made that would require a user to initiate CSC during normal flight.
The exception would be if you were flying the Inspire like a sports quad - which it isn't and was never designed to be.
The limits of stick throw may be reached if you were flying 3d maneuvers on a hell but that is not what the Inspire is intended for.
 
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I can't think of a single reason why I would need or want to fly my craft in the CSC stick position.

The manual does warn against doing this in flight as it was shut off the motors. Seems like it would be simple for them to prevent accidental mid-flight CSC if they also required there be a stable altitude for a second or two before the motors would disengage.
Chances are if you were in a situation requiring an emergency shut down you wouldn't have 2 seconds of stable altitude.
 
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Just for clarity, there are two CSC movements. The original manual didn't include the second one:

- Left stick pointed full left/full Down), Right Stick full right/full Down)

- Left stick pointed full right/full Down), Right Stick full left/full Down)

I recently saw a thread where someone activated the second one as they didn't know about it, and it was updated in the electronic manual (vs. the printed).

Thanks,
Mike
 
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it's funny this has come up again. this is another topic I discussed. everyone and their mom said I was full of it and there was no way the motors could be shut down in mid flight. funny to see some of those same people do a 180 saying yeah it can happen when before they would bet on their mothers life it couldn't happen.. it's just bad software programming that could easily be avoided if they just removed the feature or changed the shutdown command to something other then full down stick for 3 seconds.
 
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it's funny this has come up again. this is another topic I discussed. everyone and their mom said I was full of it and there was no way the motors could be shut down in mid flight. funny to see some of those same people do a 180 saying yeah it can happen when before they would bet on their mothers life it couldn't happen.. it's just bad software programming that could easily be avoided if they just removed the feature or changed the shutdown command to something other then full down stick for 3 seconds.
This has me confused. You are saying that if you hold the throttle stick down for 3 seconds, it will do a CSC maneuver?

The WIKI clearly states that this is possible, ONCE grounded.

I am newer to this forum, and if previously discussed, sorry! Please link me and/or simply answer my question.

My concern is that if I am 120M high, it can take more than 3 seconds with throttle down position to descend. Hence, I cannot imagine there is another CSC method other than down inwards/outwards on BOTH sticks; other than being on the ground with the 3 second throttle (using VPS?).

Thanks,
Mike
 
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Guys! CSC must be. I can imagine lot of situations when HAVE to be used but its not the point now - never wish nobody to use it in air. Three seconds to activate its bit a lot - for me could be just lil more than 1 second. Read manual and try on the ground without props and u will catch how it works. I have always in my mind when flyin I1 that not to use moves from single prop 3d
 
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Don't people read the manual?????????????????????????????? If you don't know what the controls do, don't fly it until you do!!!!!!!!
 
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it's funny this has come up again. this is another topic I discussed. everyone and their mom said I was full of it and there was no way the motors could be shut down in mid flight. funny to see some of those same people do a 180 saying yeah it can happen when before they would bet on their mothers life it couldn't happen.. it's just bad software programming that could easily be avoided if they just removed the feature or changed the shutdown command to something other then full down stick for 3 seconds.
Do you even read before replying?
 
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One of the EuroUSC instructors who took a ground school i recently attended told me that he'd initiated a CSC at 400ft and then restarted at 300ft and the Inspire regained control. I told him that in the sim the Inspire drops straight down and he said it doesn't do that in reality, it starts to tumble but it did regain stability after restarting.

Would have to be a last resort for me to test it though!
 
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One of the EuroUSC instructors who took a ground school i recently attended told me that he'd initiated a CSC at 400ft and then restarted at 300ft and the Inspire regained control. I told him that in the sim the Inspire drops straight down and he said it doesn't do that in reality, it starts to tumble but it did regain stability after restarting.

Would have to be a last resort for me to test it though!
My only question to the group is that I had the understanding that the Inspire 1 flight controller couldn't right itself if the aircraft became inverted, does anyone know if this is true? If that is true, then the obvious risk is that the tumble is uncontrolled and may end up inverting the aircraft.
 
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I know I'm likely to get some hostile response for saying this ... but here goes.
I don't like the idea that, while in flight, I can inadvertently introduce a command that shuts down the aircraft ( as it is defined by FAA !).

When we film events we sometimes hover over the subject, camera down fully ,and ascend rapidly while yawing fully right. This has the effect of spinning the event and is a very effective camera move. Once at altitude we will often reverse this and descend with full right yaw. The thought that during this manoeuvre ( remember the I1 is a camera platform), if the aircraft was drifting forward and right slightly and the operator were to correct that drift ,the aircraft could/would shut down and cease being an aircraft is a terrifying thought.

I know it is published in the manual, however any situation where it is possible to inadvertently shut down the aircraft is not good.

When we get to regulations and start coming under more scrutiny the operation restrictions and shutdown procedures for safe flight will come under more and more rigorous requirements, if I'm flying our bell jetranger and can accidentally shut down power using a combination of collective and cyclic then rest assured that line of aircraft would be grounded in seconds.
I don't see any reason why the inertia sensors in the I1 cant be used to prevent shutdown whilst the aircraft is actually in moving on any axis in the air. There is only one situation where we should be able to shutdown.... and that my friends is on the GROUND!
 
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It would be pilot error to "inadvertently" shut down the craft with a stick movement that is described in the manual.

I understand the scenario you're trying to create that would result in the pilot to move the sticks toward CSC position but let's be honest filmmakers for a second and acknowledge that holding the sticks in CSC position for the 3 seconds required to disable the motors would yield pretty unusable footage. If you disagree, I'd ask that you go record some footage with sticks in position opposite that of CSC (to the top) and post the footage you think is usable.
I don't think I stated that it would be usable, but actually when in the rotation the I1 can and does drift a little, especially when in ATTI mode and that stick adjustment, merely to maintain position could shut it down.

just because it is in the manual ( not correctly in the first manual I might add) doesn't mean it is right!
If you car manual states that if you turn on your windscreen wipers at the same time as you indicate left whilst braking then it automatically accelerate to full throttle and lock the steering do you think that would be allowed? of course not.

in my firm opinion NO aircraft should have the ability to shut down mid flight without a deliberate set of actions from the pilot that may not be inadvertently replicated during the normal operation of the flight controls. All DJI have to do is change the parameters for the shut down conditions.
The first time a pilot loses control of his I1 in this way and injures someone seriously we will all be grounded, period. It isn't a matter of if but when. better to deal with a potential problem now rather than when it is too late.

Those of you who disagree please provide me with a scenario where it is more likely that serious injury would occur if the pilot could not shut down the motors mid flight.
 

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I don't think I stated that it would be usable, but actually when in the rotation the I1 can and does drift a little, especially when in ATTI mode and that stick adjustment, merely to maintain position could shut it down.

just because it is in the manual ( not correctly in the first manual I might add) doesn't mean it is right!
If you car manual states that if you turn on your windscreen wipers at the same time as you indicate left whilst braking then it automatically accelerate to full throttle and lock the steering do you think that would be allowed? of course not.

in my firm opinion NO aircraft should have the ability to shut down mid flight without a deliberate set of actions from the pilot that may not be inadvertently replicated during the normal operation of the flight controls. All DJI have to do is change the parameters for the shut down conditions.
The first time a pilot loses control of his I1 in this way and injures someone seriously we will all be grounded, period. It isn't a matter of if but when. better to deal with a potential problem now rather than when it is too late.

Those of you who disagree please provide me with a scenario where it is more likely that serious injury would occur if the pilot could not shut down the motors mid flight.
Obviously just my opinion but I disagree greatly. If something happens to the quad in the air (stupid example: bird strike or clipped a tree) and now the quad can not be properly controlled for physical reasons (not connection reasons) and is heading right at a group of old ladies eating ice cream..... Two choices remain, hit them or shut 'er down.
 
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Obviously just my opinion but I disagree greatly. If something happens to the quad in the air (stupid example: bird strike or clipped a tree) and now the quad can not be properly controlled for physical reasons (not connection reasons) and is heading right at a group of old ladies eating ice cream..... Two choices remain, hit them or shut 'er down.
Shutting it down doesn't regain control! Clip a tree and hold a CSC for three seconds before it hits the ground ... don't see that being possible never mind plausible.

If a catastrophic bird strike occurs high enough to be able to do a CSC then the rotors turning at idle would be the least of anyone's concerns.
Please note I'm not against being able to shut it down, just 100% against being able to shut it down inadvertently.

I cant instruct it to come home without it being a specific and separate instruction but I can accidentally shut it down mid flight ... it just doesn't make sense. Why not give me a combination of say return home button and power button at the same time..... Easy.

Flying a Helicopter and sailing a large yacht are all about one thing f**k up management ...... prevent the f**k ups from happening and your safe.
 

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Shutting it down doesn't regain control! Clip a tree and hold a CSC for three seconds before it hits the ground ... don't see that being possible never mind plausible.

If a catastrophic bird strike occurs high enough to be able to do a CSC then the rotors turning at idle would be the least of anyone's concerns.
Please note I'm not against being able to shut it down, just 100% against being able to shut it down inadvertently.

I cant instruct it to come home without it being a specific and separate instruction but I can accidentally shut it down mid flight ... it just doesn't make sense. Why not give me a combination of say return home button and power button at the same time..... Easy.

Flying a Helicopter and sailing a large yacht are all about one thing f**k up management ...... prevent the f**k ups from happening and your safe.
Again, agree to disagree. Maybe I did not make myself clear but if the quad is flying latterly at someone and you have little to no control, your best option is to shut down and as fast as you can. Multiple steps would just make that harder. As for the helicopter comment, are you a helicopter Pilot? If so we did not go through the same training because a good 25% of the flight school is how to handle an emergency when you are in one. They are not always preventable. As most of the people here can agree (accept you I guess, not hating, just saying) there are no reasons to use such odd, full inputs. We should rarely use full inputs as it is never mind in such a strange combination.
I guess I can agree there should be a different option for people who do not like it. I, however, would not have it any other way.
 
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Again, agree to disagree. Maybe I did not make myself clear but if the quad is flying latterly at someone and you have little to no control, your best option is to shut down and as fast as you can. Multiple steps would just make that harder. As for the helicopter comment, are you a helicopter Pilot? If so we did not go through the same training because a good 25% of the flight school is how to handle an emergency when you are in one. They are not always preventable. As most of the people here can agree (accept you I guess, not hating, just saying) there are no reasons to use such odd, full inputs. We should rarely use full inputs as it is never mind in such a strange combination.
I guess I can agree there should be a different option for people who do not like it. I, however, would not have it any other way.
Mazz, I respect your right to disagree,and honestly this is the farthest from a personal attack as it could be, however I have yet to hear an ounce of logic that supports your view to maintain the ability to shut down an aircraft using only operation of the primary flight controls.
This is ALL about UNNECESSARY risk!

I am indeed a helicopter pilot, having had my PPLH for almost 15 years and yes I was trained in emergency procedures and have done numerous autorotation landings and two full on emergency landings. So I am as familiar with the process as I would like to be.

To quote you "not always preventable" well it is important to prevent what we can ...... There are a number of documented CSC shutdowns that were not deliberate. These were preventable .... simply by software code checking whether the aircraft is moving on any axis before permitting the aircraft to shutdown.

In your scenario where "the quad is flying latterly at someone and you have little to no control, your best option is to shut down and as fast as you can" and trying to execute CSC would be unnatural, while the aircraft has power you would naturally work to do everything you could to regain control. An aircraft moving in any direction whether in control or not has by virtue of the fact it is travelling some degree of lift. The moment you remove power you remove lift. The moment there is no lift there is no control over direction or speed save for the fact that your 2.5 kilo brick will accelerate to up to terminal velocity.

Give me whatever lift is available and let me try to regain control in an emergency. By all means offer me the ability to hit RTH three times, say a hail Mary and throw salt over my left shoulder then shut down the motors.

When you state "We should rarely use full inputs as it is never mind in such a strange combination. " your actually helping my argument. That fact that something is rare, or strange does not mean it doesn't or cannot happen. It has never happened to me but I am often concerned that during some manoeuvres it could happen and more importantly it HAS happened to others. It is preventable.

As for the merits of not having the props rotating on impact. The props are so light and have such little inertia that the damage they can inflict upon a full impact is minimal in comparison to the damage inflicted by 2.5 kilos travelling at any speed. it doesn't take much to stop the props when the aircraft has hit something solid.

If your happy flying with the possibility that you can shut down your bird and turn it into a brick accidentally then maintain your opinion. If you would rather eliminate unnecessary risk then come over to the light side! LOL
 
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I have to agree, there is no logic to having such a destructive option on the main controls, it should be somewhere that would require your hands to be moved from the sticks. It's a little like telling fighter pilots that the ejector seat is now engaged with a combination of throttle and stick input.. I can't imagine that would be very popular either.
 
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...If your happy flying with the possibility that you can shut down your bird and turn it into a brick accidentally then maintain your opinion. If you would rather eliminate unnecessary risk then come over to the light side! LOL
Haha ya I think we pretty much understand each other. I haven't had a reason and hopefully never will but I definitely like the option to shut er down quick. I guess I just don't feel as susceptible since I know it is there and don't do that. Kinda like when you are adjusting your choke in the plane. You could pull it all the way out and shut down the engine but we all know not to. Two different but logical opinions on the matter. I see your point but I'll keep my own ;)
 

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