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Correct motor mount angle

Joined
Jun 12, 2014
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#21
- @Jeff. Can you please tell in which condition you make your mesurement : 1 You take the drone in landing mode and you put it on a table or 2. you put it on a table in transport mode and active the landing mode and let the aircraft come alone in landing mode.
I place the I2 on a table in transport mode, I then convert it to landing mode and take the measurement. It’s pretty consistent every time.

As to your question about glue and screw tightening, I would never use glue unless it was designed to be there. As to screws, I use blue loktite on the threads and only tighten down until any unnecessary motion of the restrained component is removed.
 
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#22
to Clarify my loctite comment. Only use loctite on places that have metal receivers. Never ever Loctite to plastic it will eat it alive.
 
Likes: Advexure
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#23
thanks jeff, also did you have the height of propeller at the center of the frame ? (around 21,cm) ?

Thanks
 
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#24
I discovered my front props to be off a fair amount, so after aligning the front props to be the same, I checked the rear props..they were off even further than the front before I adjusted anything..seems Frank and company “Split the difference” on mine.
 
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#26
Well I adjusted mine. Once side was one notch too high and the other, one notch to low. They are now 21.5 cm on both sides like above in landing mode but when I transform it for flight mode one side is slightly higher than the other by a couple of mm, so something is still a bit out. Will test fly later this week and report back.
 
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#27
In my tinkering with the relevant angles of the motors, I've found that a 93-97 degree variance is tolerable. Just as long as the arms do not have a difference of more than a couple degrees between them. Anything further than that, you're bound to have some issues.
 
Likes: Phil DeVore
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#28
Greetings!
Late to this party but still bearing gifts, I rebuilt my third Inspire 1 recently and can report setting a common anhedral angle of 3 degrees in all three builds.

I arrived at the number by
a) taking photos of my Inspires while in flight and when new.

As a long-time pilot, I noticed the anhedral set of the props immediately and thought there might well have been something wrongly set up with my bird.
However, more shots of other Inspire 1's confirmed that the unusual prop and motor angle was, in fact, designed that way.

b) the giveaway for me has been the set of the Inspire's feet when in landing/takeoff mode.

If I set up the drone on glass or other flat surface, the bottoms of the landing gear feet (its "soles", I.e.) have a slight but very definite angle to them. If I relax the prop angle screws and let the craft settle down on its feet properly, I can see that my prop angles also settle down to around 2-3 degrees anhedral. There's nothing tentative about it - it settles down with a solid "clunk". And stays there. Subsequent measurement with an RC heli prop angle tool yielded the 2-3 degree angle result.

BTW I use the same glass technique when building the booms/motor mounts to ensure that fore and aft motors are aligned and their drive shafts are in line.

Slightly political rant and thoughts follow:

DJI mystique and monopoly aside, these are, bottom line, R/C aircraft, and must follow all the rules of same, even if made in China by an company with delusions like Apple.

It would be very interesting to get the FAA to go after them to issue us with a manufacturer's POH with all the manufacturer's flight data clearly stated, since the FAA rules that we are rPICs and bear the responsibility of pre-flight inspection at the very least.
In fact I think the FAA's definition of a UAV and their licensing laws kinda mandate that, don't they?

Oh - sorry - pilot speak is a bore!
FYI if you need it:
FAA: the USA's Federal Aviation Authority
POH: pilot's operating handbook. Every real aircraft has one.
rPIC: remote pilot in command
UAV: unmanned aerial vehicle

Happy Holidays!
Chris
 

The Editor

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#29
Greetings!
Late to this party but still bearing gifts, I rebuilt my third Inspire 1 recently and can report setting a common anhedral angle of 3 degrees in all three builds.

I arrived at the number by
a) taking photos of my Inspires while in flight and when new.

As a long-time pilot, I noticed the anhedral set of the props immediately and thought there might well have been something wrongly set up with my bird.
However, more shots of other Inspire 1's confirmed that the unusual prop and motor angle was, in fact, designed that way.

b) the giveaway for me has been the set of the Inspire's feet when in landing/takeoff mode.

If I set up the drone on glass or other flat surface, the bottoms of the landing gear feet (its "soles", I.e.) have a slight but very definite angle to them. If I relax the prop angle screws and let the craft settle down on its feet properly, I can see that my prop angles also settle down to around 2-3 degrees anhedral. There's nothing tentative about it - it settles down with a solid "clunk". And stays there. Subsequent measurement with an RC heli prop angle tool yielded the 2-3 degree angle result.

BTW I use the same glass technique when building the booms/motor mounts to ensure that fore and aft motors are aligned and their drive shafts are in line.

Slightly political rant and thoughts follow:

DJI mystique and monopoly aside, these are, bottom line, R/C aircraft, and must follow all the rules of same, even if made in China by an company with delusions like Apple.

It would be very interesting to get the FAA to go after them to issue us with a manufacturer's POH with all the manufacturer's flight data clearly stated, since the FAA rules that we are rPICs and bear the responsibility of pre-flight inspection at the very least.
In fact I think the FAA's definition of a UAV and their licensing laws kinda mandate that, don't they?

Oh - sorry - pilot speak is a bore!
FYI if you need it:
FAA: the USA's Federal Aviation Authority
POH: pilot's operating handbook. Every real aircraft has one.
rPIC: remote pilot in command
UAV: unmanned aerial vehicle

Happy Holidays!
Chris
This thread is regarding the Inspire 2 and the correct angle on both aircraft is achieved using a jig which is not available to the general public
 
Likes: Phil DeVore
Joined
Oct 23, 2016
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#30
Sorry, Mr. Editor -
Really??
Is the Inspire 1 not an aircraft, under FAA regulations?
Doesn't it have an anhedral/dihedral angle like almost all winged aircraft?
Does the PIC not have command of his craft, not necessarily as a mechanic, but to do an accurate pre-flight?
Does the FAA not mandate that for its 107 pilots?

So - doesn't this apply to Inspire 2's as well?
Maybe the actual angle number itself might be different, but every other "real" vehicle on the planet has manufacturer's specs that are published.
"Not available to the public" is, IMHO, simply Apple-style nonsense.
If the FAA mandates PIC responsibilities in UAVs, especially upscale UAVs like the Inspires (not just the more expensive ones - let's forget about snobbery, shall we, just for a moment? And think about safety in flight, Rule #1 in any flight manual or rule book?
Which way do they want it? Is it a toy to be returned to the manufacturer every time it malfunctions by its owners/drivers?
Or is it a remote aircraft piloted by rPICs?
 

The Editor

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Aug 7, 2013
Messages
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4,920
#31
Sorry, Mr. Editor -
Really??
Is the Inspire 1 not an aircraft, under FAA regulations?
Doesn't it have an anhedral/dihedral angle like almost all winged aircraft?
Does the PIC not have command of his craft, not necessarily as a mechanic, but to do an accurate pre-flight?
Does the FAA not mandate that for its 107 pilots?

So - doesn't this apply to Inspire 2's as well?
Maybe the actual angle number itself might be different, but every other "real" vehicle on the planet has manufacturer's specs that are published.
"Not available to the public" is, IMHO, simply Apple-style nonsense.
If the FAA mandates PIC responsibilities in UAVs, especially upscale UAVs like the Inspires (not just the more expensive ones - let's forget about snobbery, shall we, just for a moment? And think about safety in flight, Rule #1 in any flight manual or rule book?
Which way do they want it? Is it a toy to be returned to the manufacturer every time it malfunctions by its owners/drivers?
Or is it a remote aircraft piloted by rPICs?
Yup really.

Certain maintenance/set ups are not designed to be tinkered with by the end user (although many do) and have zero to do with air worthiness.
I fly a fleet of UAS by different manufacturers and am CAA authorised in various weight class of aircraft to operate commercially as well as certified for night flying.
My ops manual is submitted annually and in order to gain my qualifications I also underwent a practical flying examination (which I understand the US does not have/bother with). This included pre/post flight checks (under observation), mission planning, site survey, crew briefing and post flight de-brief.
At no point in my years of flying multirotors commercially have I been asked or required to know what angle the props should be set at.
So, to answer your question - yes really.
 

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