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DJI Inspire 2 X4S vs X5S ultimate in-depth camera comparison

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So, here is the deal. DJI comes out with the Inspire 2 which of course has two different cameras that you can purchase. Descriptions on the product don't always give the most accurate assessment which is why I was looking for a good camera comparitive video. On this video, both cameras X4S and X5s on the DJI Inspire 2 are put through a series of tests such as sharpness, flaring, dynamic range, ISO performance or night shots to see whether there was a difference. These are the results. What do you guys think?

 
I would definitely choose the X5S over the X4S. I think the Inspire is just too expensive to be stuck with a basic lens. If you don't want swappable lens and raw/pro res format, then a Phantom 4 Pro is a better option.

However, I will hold on to my Inspire 1 with X5 for while.
 
So, here is the deal. DJI comes out with the Inspire 2 which of course has two different cameras that you can purchase. Descriptions on the product don't always give the most accurate assessment which is why I was looking for a good camera comparitive video. On this video, both cameras X4S and X5s on the DJI Inspire 2 are put through a series of tests such as sharpness, flaring, dynamic range, ISO performance or night shots to see whether there was a difference. These are the results. What do you guys think?

Moved to the correct place - again.
 
Mmm... kinda hard to draw conclusions about sharpness and noise when framing and magnification is different because one camera uses a 24mm equivalent lens and the other a 30mm equivalent lens.

To my eyes, there isn't that much difference between the two except in low light. I'd love to see a comparison with the Olympus 12mm lens. Actually, in low light, the x5s should have been shot at F1.7, which would've made for an even more pronounced difference in noise.
 
Agreed, the analysis is flawed unfortunately, pity to take all that time and then miss a basic point like that.
 
Hello. Anyone knows where to find the balancing ring for the Panasonic Lumix 14-42mm/3.5-5.6 HD lens, compatible with the new X5S camera gimbal?

Thanks.

Have you filmed with this lens yet? It has a barrel effect on the x5s at this time.
 
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Ah ok, but what is this effect? I'm not sure of what it is exactly, it's not the jello effect that the Olympus zoom lens has?

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 
Kinda like this. Ill try to get some images tomorrow with it installed. It should be fixed in a fw update plus it works really good on my g7 so I am keeping it :)

EuFFJ.jpg
 
Oh crap .. Does this happen all the time? I just purchased this lens!

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 
Hello. Anyone knows where to find the balancing ring for the Panasonic Lumix 14-42mm/3.5-5.6 HD lens, compatible with the new X5S camera gimbal?

Thanks.

I got mine on dji store. just search balancing ring and their should be options in the same way that you did or didn't chose the i2 premium option. chose the appropriate option and purchase as usual. should be under 15$. Hope this helps!
 
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First of all we have to keep in mind with this comparison that in additional to the focal length change we are simultaneously experiencing a change in lens sharpness/contrast and sensor resolving power. That's quite a few variables.

All that said, am I the only one who is puzzled by the X4S delivering a less sharp image at F4 than F2.8?? That really does not make sense. Further, it seems odd to compare sharpness of two lenses primarily by examining an area that's so far away from the center of the image.
 
ZenFlyer, in my own testing of the P4P lens, the sharpness is pretty much same from F2.8 until around F6.3. After that diffraction sets in. Because the sensor size and pixel density, it makes sense that the X4S would be sharper at F2.8 than F4 -- by F4, which is equivalent roughly to F11 on a full frame camera, you already have some (minor) diffraction softening setting in. That's a physical limitation (and incidentally part of the reason why smaller-sensor cameras and cellphone have lenses that are F2.8 or brighter -- anything narrower would be severely diffraction limited.

Checking sharpness near the edges of the frame is also actually sound in theory. Most lenses are quite sharp in the center. What makes for a great lens is sharpness uniformity throughout the image, all the way into the corners.
 
ZenFlyer, in my own testing of the P4P lens, the sharpness is pretty much same from F2.8 until around F6.3. After that diffraction sets in. Because the sensor size and pixel density, it makes sense that the X4S would be sharper at F2.8 than F4 -- by F4, which is equivalent roughly to F11 on a full frame camera, you already have some (minor) diffraction softening setting in. That's a physical limitation (and incidentally part of the reason why smaller-sensor cameras and cellphone have lenses that are F2.8 or brighter -- anything narrower would be severely diffraction limited.

Checking sharpness near the edges of the frame is also actually sound in theory. Most lenses are quite sharp in the center. What makes for a great lens is sharpness uniformity throughout the image, all the way into the corners.

I'm sorry but I think you're application of diffraction is incorrect. There is good explanation of this here: Diffraction Limited Photography: Pixel Size, Aperture and Airy Disks

Further, The X4S has a one inch sensor, which is actually quite large by point-and-shoot standards. It is also the same size, and essentially the same sensor, that appears in the Sony RX100 series, of which I have two (the II and IV). One of them has a widest focal length of (35mm equivalent) 28mm, the other 24mm. Both are sharpest stopped down a few stops from fully open (generally in the f4/f5.6 respectively). This has been the case with every lens I have worked with from point-and-shoot to large format.

I'm not trying to be a jerk or start a huge argument because I have only been working with the I2 for a few weeks, but I am certain of the above principles.
 
I'm sorry but I think you're application of diffraction is incorrect. There is good explanation of this here: Diffraction Limited Photography: Pixel Size, Aperture and Airy Disks

Which part do you think is incorrect? From the website you linked:

For an ideal circular aperture, the 2-D diffraction pattern is called an "airy disk," after its discoverer George Airy. The width of the airy disk is used to define the theoretical maximum resolution for an optical system (defined as the diameter of the first dark circle).

As a result of the sensor's anti-aliasing filter (and the Rayleigh criterion above), an airy disk can have a diameter of about 2-3 pixels before diffraction limits resolution (assuming an otherwise perfect lens). However, diffraction will likely have a visual impact prior to reaching this diameter.

Using the calculator on the same page, you'll find that for the x4s sensor (same size as the Sony RX100), at F2.8, you have an Airy Diameter: 3.7 µm and a Pixel Diameter: 2.4. So at F2.8 the Airy Diameter is about 1.5 pixels, and there should be only limited softening of the image due to diffraction. At F4, the Airy is 5.3 µm, or about 2.2 pixels in width. Some diffraction softening should be visible. At F5.6, you get Airy Diameter: 7.5 µm or 3.12 pixels, so diffraction should certainly be visible.

Screen Shot 2017-01-25 at 10.20.02 AM.png


What you're observing with the RX100 you've worked with is that the lens wide open has noticeable aberrations that limit the resolution/sharpness which are partially occluded by stepping down a few stops. Of course, by F4 and F5.6, you will certainly have some diffraction-caused softening, However, the gains in sharpness caused by the occlusion of the lens aberrations at smaller apertures may outweigh the diffraction softening, so the image will be overall sharper. This doesn't appear to be the case with the x4s, which is a prime lens and probably has fewer aberrations than the rx100's zoom lens. This means you'd have less to gain by closing the aperture to occlude the aberrations, and thus diffraction would become comparatively more noticeable.
 
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