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Night LEDs and filming on Inspire 1 & 2

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I'm planning some night videography for this summer and using the STROBON CREE LEDs on my Inspire. Will I see nave green red and white LED nighting bleed into my nighttime footage? The position lite (white) is mounted bottom rear and the positions lights are going mid-ships on the crontrol arms, or at least that's the plan.

Anyone have anything on this issue? Is it an issue? I don't wanna drop 60 USD on the nav lights if they are going to interfere with filming and I can't think of a scenario where I'd have them on at night and not film.

It's certainly only a matter of time before external lighting is integrated at the factory for most models but we'll pay for that one way or another as well.
 
It depends on the humidity level. If high, then you’ll see wash.

And if in the US, has the FAA open up night flight yet? I know they said they were, but I haven’t followed up.
 
I will assume by your tagline you are flying the Inspire 1 Pro? I do use the strobe for night flying with all running lights enabled and have had no flare or glare issues when I fly a 14 or 15mm prime with the Pro camera (M4/3). I do fly the 14-42mm telephoto with no problems. My strobe is mounted all the way in the rear, next to the battery compartment. Hope this helps. I can get photos if you need them.
 
I'm planning some night videography for this summer and using the STROBON CREE LEDs on my Inspire. Will I see nave green red and white LED nighting bleed into my nighttime footage? The position lite (white) is mounted bottom rear and the positions lights are going mid-ships on the crontrol arms, or at least that's the plan.

Anyone have anything on this issue? Is it an issue? I don't wanna drop 60 USD on the nav lights if they are going to interfere with filming and I can't think of a scenario where I'd have them on at night and not film.

It's certainly only a matter of time before external lighting is integrated at the factory for most models but we'll pay for that one way or another as well.
What are the lighting requirements anyway. I know they have to be visible up to 3 nm, but is red, white, and green all required or can you just use one of the 3? I just ordered the Stobon Cree white which I plan on mounting on top so its clear of the lens.
 
I flew as a contract pilot this last summer for Discovery Channel's Discover ID and one segment was at night. This required us to have lights that are identical for twilight flight, three of us (pilot, camera operator and visual observer) did this training so we could include that as part of the night waiver and then we applied for the Daylight Waiver. Here are links to the options we used.

Lights here.
Another light solution here.
Mounts here.
Training here.
Daylight Waiver Overview here.

I've PM'd you an article on Twilight Flying I wrote, which lists the lights that we used.
 
I flew as a contract pilot this last summer for Discovery Channel's Discover ID and one segment was at night. This required us to have lights that are identical for twilight flight, three of us (pilot, camera operator and visual observer) did this training so we could include that as part of the night waiver and then we applied for the Daylight Waiver. Here are links to the options we used.

Lights here.
Another light solution here.
Mounts here.
Training here.
Daylight Waiver Overview here.

I've PM'd you an article on Twilight Flying I wrote, which lists the lights that we used.
CP, thanks for the links and info. I just purchased 1 white strobe, wish I would have waited for your posting and go with the combo. Guess its good to have a spare!
 
What are the lighting requirements anyway. I know they have to be visible up to 3 nm, but is red, white, and green all required or can you just use one of the 3? I just ordered the Stobon Cree white which I plan on mounting on top so its clear of the lens.
I use Strobon White LED as a position marker [back lower battery edge], and port and starboard (green/red) nav lights (also strobes).
 
Is that what you "choose" to use or are you fulfilling a requirement to have XX number of night nav lights?
I choose to use two for my own peace of mind. I would recommend checking out Ultimate Guide-Drone Anti-Collision Lights for Civil Twilight & Night Flying. He is a lawyer, full sized pilot and drone pilot. I use his website for reference often.

From his website:
What are Drone Anti-Collision Lights?
Not everything is an anti-collision light. This is where everyone gets confused.

Anti-collision lights are (1) red or white and (2) blinking/strobing.

Navigation lights are: (1) red, green, and white and (2) solid. Here is a picture from the Rupprecht Drones Night Operations Video Course that visually explains navigation lights on manned aircraft.

drone-navigation-lights
This is extremely important because you need to make sure your lights communicate accurate information to other aircraft so they can see and avoid your drone. There are lights being sold out there in blue, yellow, etc. but these colors do not mean anything to other aircraft.

One great example of a light communications failure is your DJI Phantom which totally fails at having navigation lights. (e.g. the green lights should not be on the back but the front right and back right.)
In addition to the colors, the drone anti-collision light needs to be blinking/strobing.

So am I stuck putting only one light on my drone?
No, you could put on multiple drone anti-collision lights! You could have a blinking red one and a blinking white one to increase the visibility of your aircraft!

Additionally, you could also equip your aircraft with navigation lights which can be used for orientation. Section 107.31 says the remote pilot in command: “must be able to see the unmanned aircraft throughout the entire flight in order to: (1) Know the unmanned aircraft’s location; (2) Determine the unmanned aircraft’s attitude, altitude, and direction of flight[.]” Some of these drone lights can be purchased in different colors such as green and red and used as navigation lights. Some of the drone anti-collision lights on the market have the ability to change their patterns (blinking, strobe, or solid). This means if you have a red anti-collision light and can change the pattern to solid, you now have a red navigation light for the left hand side of your aircraft.

Hope this helps.
 
I choose to use two for my own peace of mind. I would recommend checking out Ultimate Guide-Drone Anti-Collision Lights for Civil Twilight & Night Flying. He is a lawyer, full sized pilot and drone pilot. I use his website for reference often.

From his website:
What are Drone Anti-Collision Lights?
Not everything is an anti-collision light. This is where everyone gets confused.

Anti-collision lights are (1) red or white and (2) blinking/strobing.

Navigation lights are: (1) red, green, and white and (2) solid. Here is a picture from the Rupprecht Drones Night Operations Video Course that visually explains navigation lights on manned aircraft.

drone-navigation-lights
This is extremely important because you need to make sure your lights communicate accurate information to other aircraft so they can see and avoid your drone. There are lights being sold out there in blue, yellow, etc. but these colors do not mean anything to other aircraft.

One great example of a light communications failure is your DJI Phantom which totally fails at having navigation lights. (e.g. the green lights should not be on the back but the front right and back right.)
In addition to the colors, the drone anti-collision light needs to be blinking/strobing.

So am I stuck putting only one light on my drone?
No, you could put on multiple drone anti-collision lights! You could have a blinking red one and a blinking white one to increase the visibility of your aircraft!

Additionally, you could also equip your aircraft with navigation lights which can be used for orientation. Section 107.31 says the remote pilot in command: “must be able to see the unmanned aircraft throughout the entire flight in order to: (1) Know the unmanned aircraft’s location; (2) Determine the unmanned aircraft’s attitude, altitude, and direction of flight[.]” Some of these drone lights can be purchased in different colors such as green and red and used as navigation lights. Some of the drone anti-collision lights on the market have the ability to change their patterns (blinking, strobe, or solid). This means if you have a red anti-collision light and can change the pattern to solid, you now have a red navigation light for the left hand side of your aircraft.

Hope this helps.
Now that's a brilliant answer and thank you for spelling it out. I got lucky, I bought one white light. Just need my nav lights now.

Thank you again for your explanation.

Matt
 
I'm somewhat used to the aviation/maritime lighting configuration. Red on left - green on right equals viewing from the rear ... and vice-versa ... however, note that if you can't see the lights, positioning will revert back to FPV information on your tablet/phone/etc. (if it's still connected!) ...

I also tend to have my lights on most if not all of the time. I'm still getting used to night flying and it's looking like these lights won't interfere with the 1" inch sensors unless fog or heavy moisture is around (which I also usually try to avoid). CP above sounds like he has some dusk/night time up there.
 

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